Triangle Technology

You may have seen this video circling around:

Among its charms are the masks four of the dancers wear. One thing that caught my eye was the texture of the face. It reminded me of Buckminster Fuller, actually, and geodesic domes. Granted, I know only a little little bit about geodesics, but the visual similarity is interesting.

Inside of a (rather comfy)  geodesic dome temporarily set up in Portland in 2013.
Inside of a (rather comfy) geodesic dome temporarily set up in Portland in 2013.
Spaceship Earth at EPCOT, a geodesic sphere
Spaceship Earth at EPCOT, a geodesic sphere
Wireframe Self Portrait

I followed my curiosity to the homepage of the designer Eric Testroete. Eric works often as a game designer, but also has had some side projects, including this self portrait mask from 2009.

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Here’s a look at some of his process. (Reposted with permission from www.testroete.com)

There are over one hundred triangles making up this face
There are over one hundred triangles making up this face
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I often find myself using bits of skills from other disciplines when making masks. This image reminds me of flat patterning for sewing.

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Mirror, Mirror
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Mask Self Portrait, 2011.

testroete-mirror-2Eric used a similar construction technique to create this mirrored mask. I am always curious about how a mask plays in time and space, with the energy of a human beneath it, so I am really glad he posted this video it in use. And who doesn’t love a good walk in the woods?

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